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#1

Posted July 17, 2016 - 03:22 AM

rainsilent

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This is a general user guide. For now it will be split up into 4 sections but I am saving room for one more just in case. Please know that this is never complete and is always an ongoing project with the work in progress label as nobody except for Anders knows everything about this game and even the best of us are constantly learning about this game. This will be bare to start with but I plan on having most of it filled to some degree within about a week or two depending upon the time available to me.

 

The 4 sections will be as follows. Team Basics, Player Basics, Team Advanced and Player Advanced. The 5th I am saving for something unforeseen or not thought of in advanced and may eventually just be used as a frequently asked questions list. If I end up needing more than 5. Umm... Oops. I'll make it work.

 

 

 

Team Basics

 

This section is all about the very basics on how to run a team. The topics covered here will be roster, cap, line and tactic basics. The very first thing to do is learn your team. Since player basics is the second part we will be getting more in depth with the player part there and we will skip to the roster in general.

 

Roster basics: The most obvious thing is that you need 18 skaters and 2 goalies at minimum. In an ideal situation you would also want 2 or 3 forwards and 1 or 2 defensemen as scratches in case of injury. Injuries happen. It is inevitable. It is best to be prepared for when it does happen so you aren't scrambling when it does. Beyond this part, in which many have probably rolled their eyes at, the only other things to really address here is team spirit and team reputation. Team spirit has 3 things underneath it. Confidence shows exactly how confidant your team is in its play. It will be more likely to grow with positive overall team results. Teamwork shows how well your team plays together. Winner instinct is basically a teams "it" factor. Does the team have "it" in them to consistently pull out wins in meaningful games.

 

Cap basics: A GHL team has a cap of 60 million to play with. SHL 15 million, BHL 4.5 million, IHL, 1.5 million and LIHL 750k. Every player has a contract that lasts a certain number of seasons. Contracts can have clauses as well. a Promotion clause means that the if the player remains on the team and the team promotes to a higher league the salary of the player will go up in proportion with the new salary. A one way clause means that the player will not go down to a lower league no matter what.

 

Line basics: Each forward line needs 3 skaters. Each defensive line 2 skaters. For the C position any skater can play it so you want to be playing the players with the best face off rating regardless of position. Also you want your best shooter not playing at C to be on the side opposite their handedness. This is called playing the off-wing. It allows this player to get better quality shots on net.

 

Tactic basics: Team tactics work in a rock, paper, scissors fashion. Each offensive and defensive system has strengths and weaknesses. However these tactics have a say in how your players develop, how your team performs and the team has to get familiar with the team tactic. When it comes to team tactics it is best to choose one based upon how you want you team to play in the long run. This is because when you change team tactics there is a "learning" period that the team has to go through and it will perform worse in the process. The players will adapt to the system. Line tactics (aka line settings) however do not work in a rock, paper, scissors fashion. Rather there basically are instructions to the players on how to play within the team system. Also they can be changed game to game without worry of change in the quality of team play.



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#2

Posted July 17, 2016 - 03:22 AM

rainsilent

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Player Basics

 

This section is all about the basics you need to know about your players. Player skills and roles combined into one, profiles and training will be covered here.

 

Player skills and roles: First I am going to break down the players into 3. Forwards, defensemen and goalies. The reasoning relates to one skill. Faceoffs. Anybody can play the center position. However you want the most highly skilled players at faceoffs to be taking faceoffs no matter if they are a center or forward. On that note faceoffs shows how good a player is at faceoffs.

 

Skating shows how good a skater the player is. The importance of this skill is relevant to the team tactics you choose to use. That, along with other such information, will be covered later. Passing and puck handling show how good a player is at passing and puck handling. Combined these two skills are used to determine how good the player is at playing in a playmaker role as a forward. Shooting is about how good a shooter the player is and alone is used to determine how good the player is at playing a sniper role as a forward. Defense shows how good the player is at defense and is used to determine how good the player is at in playing the two way role as a forward. Physical is a representation of how physical the player plays. This is used to determine 2 roles. In the power forward role physical is combined with shooting and passing to determine how good the player will be for that role as a forward. A power forward is a forward that plays physical and has offensive skill. Physical is also used in combination with the players actual size (height and weight) to determine how good of an enforcer role the player can fill as a forward. Spirit, according to the old help system was a determination of how willing the player was to block shots and how hard the player back checked. Basically I sum it up as how much the player is willing to put into each game in terms of giving it all for the team. In terms of player roles this is used to determine how good a player would be as a grinder in the forward role. Endurance shows how much the player can do before getting tired.

 

You may have noticed that I didn't include defensive player roles. The reasoning is simple. I don't think they work quite the way they should. So far as I can tell for a defenseman to be good at the two way role a defender has to be good in a defensive or offensive role first. There is a reason that I think this. I have never seen a defenseman that was only good at being a two way. However all the time I see a defender that is good at being offensive or defensive. If a requirement for one role is to be good at another first i don't think something is right.

 

The question then inevitably turns into what skills are most important for my forwards/Dmen? Well that is mostly determined by what team tactics and to a lesser degree line tactics you chose to use which again will be covered later. However I will say a few things now that I think are more basic. First will be the concession that, arguably, the most important skill for a majority of your defensemen is defense and everything else is secondary. Second that you will need some passers, scorers and pk players. Also right handed players are more likely to score more than left handed players. If you see two players with 85 in shooting with one being left handed and the other right the right handed player will be more likely to score more goals. So far as I can tell that is the only difference between right handed players and left. That being said you don't need to have but maybe one or two right handed shooter. Also player overall means nothing outside of base values for contract negotiations with players. The players individual skills are much more important than a players overall. An 85 overall player is not instantly better than an 81 overall player because of higher overall. Height and weight seem to not matter too much however the game ratings given to players is biased to physical players.

 

What about goalies? Goalies have their own skills so covering them separately seemed to be appropriate. Also there is an order of importance for skills when it comes to goalies that will pretty much never change. So here are the goalie skills grouped in order of importance and what they show. (And before anyone gets upset about me revealing something so "important" this stuff should be obvious to everyone outside of managers relatively new to hockey management games that know nothing about hockey. Also this is a guide. A guide is meant to help a player get better. A good game guide gets into the details of a game so players can understand what and why things work the way they do in game. Moving on.) Reflexes, positioning and athletics. These are the three skills that directly relate to a goalies ability to make saves and that is the primary function of your goalies. Reflexes show how quickly your goalie can react, positioning how well the goalie is at positioning themselves to the puck relative to the net and athletics is how mobile the goalie is. Puck control and spirit. These are two "modifier" skills. Puck control is how well the goalie can control their rebounds and spirit is again how all out the goalie is willing to go. The last two skills pretty much don't matter. Endurance and Puck handling. Puck handling is how well the goalie can play the puck. Endurance seems to mean nothing on a goalie since all goalies seem to be able to go the same number of games before getting tired. Also goalies that are tired seem to show no drop off in play due to fatigue.

 

Player Profiles: First it needs to be said that there are 2 hidden traits. Potential and greed. Potential is how good the player can be. Greed is how much money the player wants. The visible traits are ego, dirty, leadership, big games and ambition. Ego is how big of an ego the player has. Players with bigger egos can potentially be locker room problems. Dirty is how dirty the player plays. The more dirty they play the more likely they are to take penalties. Leadership is how good of a leader the player can be. Big games is how well a player can handle pressure. Ambition is how much desire the player has to be the best they possibly can be.

 

Training: Training can be focused one of three ways. Offensive, general and defensive. The differences between them is dictated by the team tactics you choose as those dictate what your players focus on training the most. Intensity is how hard the player trains. There is no reason to not be training on hard. Even if a player is all 99 they should be training on hard because it helps them keep that rating. Hard intensity training can also help delay a players regression due to age. If a player is getting tired give them less playing time so you can keep them on hard training.



#3

Posted July 17, 2016 - 03:22 AM

rainsilent

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Team Advanced

 

To start this section off I will give the 3 most common mistakes I see managers make and add the key reason to why so many people struggle to do well as a manager of a team consistently.

 

1. Too many big contracts, especially in term (aka length). The only reason you should give a player a contract longer than 3 season is because you can guarantee that they will be a major player on your team for the entirety of the contract from the moment they sign until the season that contract ends. Major being core of your offense, defense or #1 goalie that is exceptionally talented relative to your league. Everybody else you should be signing, and if you want resigning, to deals 1-3 seasons in length. A rule of thumb to use is having no more than 6 or so players with contracts longer than 3 seasons.

 

2. How young can you go? There are a number of managers that are obscenely obsessed with having a young team. I have seen a post before of a manager offering a 25yo player looking for a young player in return. 25 IS YOUNG! Yes you want some young players but you want some vets too. A veteran player gets a veteran experience bonus to their play making them typically play better than younger players of equal talent. At the same time players develop more the more they play. The key is striking a balance between youth and vets on your team. Keep in mind you also have draft picks that will turn into players every year. Even if you don't bother with the draft you are pretty much guaranteed to be getting 1 player than can make your roster in 3 seasons time. Having a roster full of young players is a potential disaster as you could be forced into letting go a young and talented player.

 

3. Role players are key. As much as you need offensively talented forwards you also need defensively talented ones as well. As much as you need defensively talented forwards you need defensive puck movers as well. I have seen one manager get as many of the top talented forwards as possible and not bother about D or goaltending. I have also seen a team with 4 lines of very good offensive forwards struggle because of no defensive forwards despite very good D and very good goalie. I have also seen a team that had 6 great defensive Dmen but could not pass the puck and again struggled. They were all missing key components that are needed to make a successful team. Something as "simple" as not having a handful of quality defensive forwards can make an otherwise top 6 talent team in a league finish bottom 6 in results. Just as important as having those key role players is also utilizing them correctly in your roster.

 

The one key reason players struggle with manager games is because they forget one key aspect of what a manager needs to do. Balance long term with short term. Too many managers focus on the current and very near future and it bites them big 3 or 4 seasons from then. This is most commonly seen in excessive youth movement teams and on teams that give out too many long term contracts.

 

Time for me to start on the bigger part of this. However before that a forward note. The most important thing has nothing to do with the players on your team, the tactics or anything in game really. It is all about you. More specifically you identifying what kind of team you want. What do you want the identity of your team to be? That is by far the most important thing. Do you want an all out speed team like the Pittsburgh Penguins? A physical team like the Boston Bruins? A skill possession team like the Montreal Canadiens? Without an identity for your team it is more likely to end up relying mostly on random luck for good seasons and looking mostly like the Edmonton Oilers of the past 6 or 7 seasons on a more long term basis. The big thing here is identifying what you want the identity of your team to be, to stick to it and never lose sight of it. The identity you create for your team is the foundation for your team and the basis of which everything else relies. The second most important thing is again you. Specifically you learning what you need to know.

 

Now that I have said that let us look at how that applies in the most obvious way to your team. Tactics. First and foremost the "core" tactics. The core tactics are the basis of how your team will play on the ice. These core tactics are all under the tactics section and are; Offensive tactic, Defensive tactic, Power play and Penalty kill. These dictate the foundations of how your team plays on the ice. You should choose them based upon what I said above regarding your chosen team identity. Also once you make a decision on what you will use stick to it as changing one of these will have profound negative impacts to the play of your team for an extended period until they get familiar with the new core tactic. So what is the difference between them and what kind of players skill wise do you need to make them work successfully?

 

Tactics disclaimer: I would love to get deep into the details of these tactics but honestly I can't. The tactics in this game have been simplified to a great deal to the point where multiple and very drastically different things are combined into the same categories. For example in the offensive section below almost every NHL team crashes the net and plays dump and chase to some degree while having a puck possession focused offense. Honestly though the tactics being this way is likely for the better for newer players so as not to overwhelm them.

 

Offensive tactics

 

Crash the Net: This is very simple. Puck and players to the net. In real life this isn't a tactic so much as it is a way of life. Hockey players are preached to crash the net. "Go to the net and good things will happen," "throw the puck to the net because anything could happen" and "there is no such thing as a bad shot" (there actually is) are things you commonly hear if you watch NHL games.

 

What do you need for this tactic? Players high in the physical attribute. Bigger sized players are also a plus. The good about this tactic: You only need one skill to make it work and it is very simple. The Bad: You NEED one skill to make it work or it will not work at all, it is heavily reliant on your players to have higher physical skills and be bigger than the opposing defensemen for it to work, it is simple and very easy to counter.

 

This tactic is the least efficient tactic out there and the most reliant on the opposing team being weak to it makes it pretty much not worth it. This tactic isn't garbage. it is just over reliant on a few things making it a very situational tactic at best. Using a situational tactic all of the time isn't exactly an ideal situation.

 

Dump and Chase: This is all about getting the puck deep and then getting the puck via a strong forecheck. This tactic is less about skill and more about the defensive posture of the opposing team through the neutral zone. If the defensive posture is "up" then a dump and chase is a very good tactic to use. However that is in a real hockey game.

 

What do you need for this tactic? Speed and physical skills predominantly. Like above bigger sized players are a plus. The good: This tactic is all about using your teams physical attributes to the greatest possible effect. It isn't overly reliant on puck skills. The bad: Due to the aggressive hitting nature of this tactic over aggressive players will take a lot of penalties, considering that your team will take more penalties off of the bat as it is that could really kill any momentum your team builds on a regular basis making it difficult for your team to generate much offense.

 

This tactic is still very reliant on a players physical skill so not having a lot of forwards with high physical ratings will hurt this offense a lot. This tactic and the tactic above are the two physically focused offensive styles. The dump and chase is the more versatile of the two as it is less reliant on the opponent and their skills and more about your own players and theirs.

 

Puck possession: This is all about controlling the puck in the opponents end by passing the puck around. This tactic is the basis of most modern hockey offenses. Even the LA Kings use a puck possession offense with a heavy influence of physical play whereas the Chicago Blackhawks use a more finesse based puck possession style.

 

What you need: Puck handling and passing and then more puck handling and passing and then even more. The Good: This tactic is all about the puck skills of your players. This is the most difficult offense to stop with a skilled team. The bad: This is the most difficult offense to run because it is exceptionally reliant on the puck skills of your players.

 

This tactic is very high risk high reward in nature. As a result if you don't do things right things can very easily go very wrong with this tactic. You don't need fast or physical players but that will definitely help.

 

Transition rushes: This is all about counter attacking quickly. Get the puck and get it up ice quickly trying to create odd man rushes. However in the real life game this is not an offensive strategy per se and more another part of the game altogether.

 

What you need: A lot of skating, passing and puck handling. The good: Very aggressive and fast offensive tactic that aims to take advantage of both the speed and skill of your players. The bad: This tactic has the most demands from the players as they need to be fast, good puck handlers and passers.

 

Like puck possession this is high risk high reward but it is also the tactic that demands the most out of the players which demands the most out of you as well as you need the right players for this tactic to work. Also this tactic has some reliance on the opposing team as well making it that much more harder to implement successfully.

 

Defensive tactics coming up hopefully shortly.



#4

Posted July 17, 2016 - 03:22 AM

rainsilent

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Player Advanced

 

To start this section off I will give the biggest mistake I see regularly from many managers regarding players. Overall fixation. Overall means nothing. Yes it means nothing. Seriously it means nothing. No really. It means nothing. Ok it means something. But only what you can expect a player to ask for when it comes to contracts. Beyond that it means about as much to you as the favorite color of that person you don't know driving a boat somewhere in an ocean nowhere near you that you will never meet. The player's individual skills is what is important. Let me give you an example. 2 players. Player one (P1) has an overall of 80. Player two (P2) an overall of 79. The mistake I see many managers make is going for higher overall players in FA when they don't need to and playing higher overall players higher in their lineup over more skilled players. There are at least two mismanagement issues happening here that I will get into much more deeper later. Lets look at the skills of the players I gave as examples.

 

        P1 | P2

Spd  85 | 75

Pas  75 | 85

Pct   85 | 85

Sht   75 | 85

Def   75 | 75

Phy  85 | 75

Spi   75 | 75

End  85 | 75

Fof   85 | 85

 

P1 is nothing more than a 4th line SHL or GHL checker or a poor choice for a BHL offensive forward whereas P2 is a player, depending upon the talent of the league, that can potentially play a 2nd or 3rd line offensive role in the GHL.

 

 

Player roles. How to identify them and using that to determine how to put your team together.

 

To be good at doing this yourself requires that you do a little bit of homework. Specifically scouting. Specifically scouting your league. To identify what roles a player can fill you need to know what the general "best" of your league is. You basically want to find out what the best 20 of x look like in your league. For instance I know that I have two of the best 9 playmakers (passing and puckhandling skills combined) in my game world (I used to have 3 of them but I believe in giving something to get something from the AI aka I like to make fair trades with the AI) in Mikulas Rakita and Waide Rose yet they are 84 and 83 overall respectively. They are the two lowest overall of the top 9 but there is no reason they should not be in any other teams top 6 forward group. There are only 7 other players that are as good playmakers in the entire game world. How about a more extreme example. There is a 79 overall player in my game world that is one of the top 19 playmakers of the entire game world. The next closest of the rest of the 19 on overall is 83. That player should be playing a top 6 forward role in the GHL because again there are only 18 other players in the entire game world as good as they are as a playmaker. Yes the player is pretty much crap outside of his offensive skills but he is the perfect example of a role player. He is an amazing offensive GHL talent relative to the current league and should be playing in a top 6 role. That is how you identify the roles a player can potentially play but how do you determine where to play them in your lineup? I will have to get to that later. Again I am tired.


Edited by rainsilent, July 28, 2016 - 10:26 AM.


#5

Posted July 17, 2016 - 03:22 AM

rainsilent

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Saved 4



#6

Posted July 20, 2016 - 07:36 PM

rainsilent

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Player basics has been updated.



#7

Posted July 20, 2016 - 09:06 PM

TheWizard

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Good start to the guide, thanks rainsilent!

 

One thing, isn't playing the off-wing a matter of preference?


Manager of:

Dunkirk Sea Hawks | GHL | Lumber
Prairie City Steers | SHL | Clapper
Otego Arrowheads | IHL | Dangles
Bushong Hill Giants | GHL | UAT Mitts

#8

Posted July 20, 2016 - 11:14 PM

Mint-Syrup

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Oh it's here ! Thanks Rainsilent !

 

 

 

 

Winner instinct is basically a teams "it" factor. Does the team have "it" in them to consistently pull out wins in meaningful games.

I read that before, and moved on, but since I'm asking questions, I might as well go ahead. It might be a linguistic issue, but the "it factor" doesn't mean anything to me. Is "it" an acronym ?  :P 

 

 

 

Also you want your best shooter not playing at C to be on the side opposite their handedness. This is called playing the off-wing. It allows this player to get better quality shots on net.

 

 

One thing, isn't playing the off-wing a matter of preference?

 

On the forum, I found quite a few posts alluding to the side of the wingers, but nothing precise. As you might know by now, I really don't know much about hockey in RL since it's really a small sport here in France. So I actively browsed around to know a bit more on the issue, and basically what I understood from it was that the off-wing was harder to pull off but rewarding. I figured that in RL there was a bit of both, so I didn't care much in the game.

 

Since you put it that the game rewards the off-wing, I'm gonna investigate that on my team.

 

Also, is the side a matter for defensemen ?

 

 

 

 

In the power forward role physical is combined with shooting and passing to determine how good the player will be for that role as a forward.

 

Again, ignorant concerning RL hockey questions. From reading Nicolas Senet, I got that powerforwards have a more defensive approach, concentrating on hits. But if shooting and passing matter, then he's more of an all-rounder, isn't he ?

 

I have an interest in this role, since it seems to fit well in most lines.



#9

Posted July 21, 2016 - 12:33 AM

rainsilent

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Good start to the guide, thanks rainsilent!

 

One thing, isn't playing the off-wing a matter of preference?

 

Yes and no. Yes in the sense of reality that some players do and don't like it and players can pass the puck better and protect the puck better with the puck on their natural side. No in the sense that this is a game where, just like reality, it is easier to score on the off wing. There is no yes part in the game minus your own personal preference whereas there is the benefit of better scoring on the off wing. So if there is no known same side benefit but there is an off-wing benefit in game why not take advantage of the side that gives the advantage?

 

Oh it's here ! Thanks Rainsilent !

 

 

It might be a linguistic issue for me but, the "it factor" doesn't mean anything to me. Is "it" an acronym ?

 

On the forum, I found quite a few posts alluding to the side of the wingers, but nothing precise. As you might know by now, I really don't know much about hockey in RL since it's really a small sport here in France. So I actively browsed around to know a bit more on the issue, and basically what I understood from it was that the off-wing was harder to pull off but rewarding. I figured that in RL there was a bit of both, so I didn't care much in the game.

 

Since you put it that the game rewards the off-wing, I'm gonna investigate that on my team.

 

Also, is the side a matter for defensemen ?

 

Again, ignorant concerning RL hockey question. From reading Nicolas Senet, I got that powerforwards have a more defensive approach, concentrating on hits. But if shooting and passing matter, then he's more of an all-rounder, isn't he ?

 

I have an interest in this role, since it seems to fit well in most lines.

 

The it factor is a phrase in America that is used to describe intangibles. I figured this would be an issue but didn't know of a better way to put it.

 

For D I haven't noticed a difference whatsoever. However regarding off-wing it is more difficult because passes are much harder to make and receive and it is much harder to protect the puck from defenders however the benefit is one timers are easier and more effective as well as shots where the player starts with possession are much more dangerous because of a much better angle to the net.

 

Regarding power forwards they are about as defensive as snipers and playmakers. Meaning they can be defensive but they definitely are more offensive in focus. Several of the best both current and in history were not known for their defensive prowess. A power forward is an offensively focused player that plays a power (can include lots of hitting but doesn't have to) offensive game rather than a finesse game. The all around player is more the two way type. Also just because a player hits doesn't make them defensive in nature at all. A power forward is great on almost any line. They are great options on offensive, two way and energy lines. However they may not be great options to have on checking lines. Getting hits has nothing to do with defense unless you really stretch it far in an argument saying that it can force turnovers. Defense is the most important thing on a checking line and a power forward by pure definition is not about defense. That doesn't mean that there aren't good power forwards that are good defensively.

 

Let me list a few players that are, at least refereed to on occasion, as power forwards and tell me if you think they are defensive in nature. I don't do this to be rude in any way. Rather I do it so you can look at the type of players that fit the power forward mold so you can get a proper idea on what a power forward is like. Joe Thornton (its Jumbo Joe for a reason,) Milan Lucic, Shane Doan, James van Riemsdyk, Peter Forsberg, Eric Lindros, Alex Ovechkin, Brendan Shanahan, Owen Nolan, James Neal, Rick Nash.



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#10

Posted July 21, 2016 - 01:58 AM

Mint-Syrup

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Let me list a few players that are, at least refereed to on occasion, as power forwards and tell me if you think they are defensive in nature. I don't do this to be rude in any way. Rather I do it so you can look at the type of players that fit the power forward mold so you can get a proper idea on what a power forward is like. Joe Thornton (its Jumbo Joe for a reason,) Milan Lucic, Shane Doan, James van Riemsdyk, Peter Forsberg, Eric Lindros, Alex Ovechkin, Brendan Shanahan, Owen Nolan, James Neal, Rick Nash.

 

It does look like I triggered you though. It does make sense that a power forward would be an offensive player who'd make use of his physical abilities rather than finesse. You'd find this kind of profile in every team sport I know. Thanks for the explanation. 

 

As for the list of players, that's nice. I'll try to find some games to watch.



#11

Posted July 21, 2016 - 08:25 AM

rainsilent

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It does look like I triggered you though. It does make sense that a power forward would be an offensive player who'd make use of his physical abilities rather than finesse. You'd find this kind of profile in every team sport I know. Thanks for the explanation. 

 

As for the list of players, that's nice. I'll try to find some games to watch.

 

You didn't. As I tried to explain (I was pretty sure it was going to look that way but I just have a very direct approach to a conversation. I try to dial it back but it is difficult at times.) I gave that list for you to look them up so you could form your own opinion. I am not a fan of telling people what to think or making them think that I am absolutely right. I would rather give you reliable information and let you decide on your own. Hence giving you the list of players and asking you to form your own opinion. I will share my stance and opinion but outside of absolutes I would rather people make their own opinions and decisions. It is why I didn't tell you and Wizard that you had to play players on the off wing in game. Instead I gave the positives and negatives, both in real life and in game, and then left it open ended as to what you should do.



#12

Posted July 21, 2016 - 03:09 PM

Doggit

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Great start to the guide,thanks for doing it.



#13

Posted July 22, 2016 - 07:44 AM

Mint-Syrup

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Oh I forgot about a question I've wondering about for a while !

 

Anybody can play the center position. However you want the most highly skilled players at faceoffs to be taking faceoffs no matter if they are a center or forward. On that note faceoffs shows how good a player is at faceoffs.

 

So do you think there is no performance penalty for a forward not playing in his prefered position ?

 

For instance, I've had centers in the wings do fine enough, although not as spectacular as a labelled forward (but that could be explained by other factors).

 

And as a follow up question. I have a center with very low faceoff. I've noticed other centers like that here and there (you could say the same thing with defensemen with low defense stat). In some manager games, stats are balanced out in the overall rate regarding their importance for the position.

Could a center with low faceoff stat be better than his overall if he played as a winger ?



#14

Posted July 22, 2016 - 10:00 AM

rainsilent

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Oh I forgot about a question I've wondering about for a while !

 

 

 

 

So do you think there is no performance penalty for a forward not playing in his prefered position ?

 

For instance, I've had centers in the wings do fine enough, although not as spectacular as a labelled forward (but that could be explained by other factors).

 

And as a follow up question. I have a center with very low faceoff. I've noticed other centers like that here and there (you could say the same thing with defensemen with low defense stat). In some manager games, stats are balanced out in the overall rate regarding their importance for the position.

Could a center with low faceoff stat be better than his overall if he played as a winger ?

 

Any penalty for a forward (I haven't noticed one so if there is it is very small) playing C is more than negated by said forward winning draws, or at least in giving your team a better chance to win said draws over a C with less faceoff skills. Winning a faceoff is the easiest way to gain possession.

 

A center can be better on the wing but only in performance. Also there is no overall stat balancing thing here in this game. Overall means nothing besides maybe the starting point for determining player salary demands. Let player skills determine everything and pretty much ignore overall.



#15

Posted July 23, 2016 - 09:48 AM

Keskustankeisari

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If you see two players with 85 in shooting with one being left handed and the other right the right handed player will be more likely to score more goals.

 

Is this a proven fact? I haven't noticed this myself.



#16

Posted July 23, 2016 - 07:33 PM

rainsilent

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Is this a proven fact? I haven't noticed this myself.

 

It said such in the in game help files that were there previously.



#17

Posted July 28, 2016 - 10:14 AM

rainsilent

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Updated again with just the opening segments in both of the advanced sections.



#18

Posted August 02, 2016 - 12:56 PM

Doggit

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Once again, thanks for taking the time to do this, all really helpful.



#19

Posted August 09, 2016 - 11:22 PM

rainsilent

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Offensive tactics are now up. Sorry about the more than week long delay.



#20

Posted June 21, 2017 - 07:37 PM

MWiles

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What is the basic make up if the different types of lines? Also how do I choose dmen with 4 lines of forwards and 3 lines of def?

If at first you don't succeed, use a bigger bat

It's not paranoia if they are really out to get you!




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